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Good Foods Bad Foods 5

Rancid fats and oils:

These create free radicals, which are highly reactive molecules that can initiate chain reactions of chemical disruption, injuring cell membranes, enzymes, and DNA. They have a negative impact on a wide range of conditions such as aging, cancer, inflammation, degenerative disease, viral infections, and AIDS.

Common sources of rancid fats and oils are nuts, chips, baked goods, and fried foods. At higher temperatures and exposure to light, oils and fats turn rancid more quickly. When foods are deep-fried, the fats used reach very high temperatures, and if the oil is re-used, as is invariably the case, the oxidative effect is magnified.

Most polyunsaturated vegetable oils, unless cold-pressed, are heated to high temperatures during processing. Hydrogenated vegetable oils, including shortenings and margarine, are also heat processed. These are all sources of free radicals. In addition, nitrates have been shown to cause cancer and should be avoided; they are found in hot dogs, sausages, salami and smoked meats.

Water:

This is the essential “ground zero” for regulating all of the body’s systems. It eases the job of the kidneys and liver to process and eliminate toxins from the blood.

It helps keep mucous membranes moist enough to combat the viruses they encounter.

It is a little known tool for reducing sugar cravings. Sugar cravings are often a sign of dehydration.

Try a big glass of water the next time you are craving sugar, then wait a few minutes and see if the need for the sugar is really still there.

Water, as well as other beverages, really should not be ice cold. Your body will have to use a lot of energy to warm it up to a temperature of 98.6 degrees it tries so hard to maintain. Try to have 6 to 8 glasses of pure water every day.

 
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